photo-1557425493-6f90ae4659fc

3 Email Personalization Tips
That Go Beyond a First Name

Personalization is just a fancy buzz word that means — make your messaging more human.

But no matter what word you use, personalization is crucial in modern day marketing.

Studies have repeatedly shown that personalized messages make consumers more likely to purchase from your brand.

In fact, 75% of all consumers are more likely to buy from you if your brand has that personal touch.

In email marketing, the easiest way to personalize your emails is to use a person’s name. And while we agree that you should do that, we all know that this one tactic has been done to death!

The truth is, adding a first name to an email isn’t the end of personalization — it’s only the beginning.

2. Send Emails Based On User Behavior With The Help Of Automation

Innovative technology has made it easier to take advantage of the personal interests of your contacts and use that to deliver emails that are as unique as they are.

This is called behavior-based email marketing and it’s pretty much like discovering a goldmine only to find there are diamonds one level down.

With this email marketing tactic, you start by analyzing your contacts’ activity in your emails and on your website. As you track this, you automate emails that trigger based on your subscriber’s activity.

Are they shopping on your website but forget to check out? Then you can send only that person an email reminding them about their cart.

Did someone sign up for your webinar? Then you can send them an automated email drip campaign that only they will get.

This only scratches the surface of what you can do.

The whole idea behind taking this approach is to really zone in on your individual customer and deliver messages that are personalized to what they’re showing interest in.

With Sendlane 3.0, you can do this so much more. We took the idea of behavior-based marketing and grafted it into the bones of our email marketing platform.

To take full advantage of this feature, you can start by installing our site tracking code called Beacon so that you’re fully tracking your users’ behavior.

What does that mean? Other ESPs will track basic things like email opens and clicks. However, the revamped Sendlane goes even further and tracks each individual’s journey on your site.

From content pages, to landing pages, to shopping cart activity and so on.

Does this person have a pattern? Do they only buy men’s clothing? Do they regularly buy items for children?

Normally, you’d need to guess the answer, but our system is set up to learn the answers to questions like these to help you send better emails that are personalized to each customer.

And all of that starts with snagging your Beacon code and installing in your website.

In the menu of your Sendlane dashboard, you’ll see the label “Beacon” and then “Conversion Rules.” Inside that tab you’ll find a button labelled “Install Beacon” and it will give you instructions on how to install the code on your website.

From there you can track events to trigger automation that you can set up to send emails based on their unique behavior. This means sending the right type of email to the right person at the right time.

Now that’s personalization!

3. Use Video In Your Emails So People Can See A Human Face

In email marketing, personalization = humanize.

So think of it this way… when you first meet someone in real life, what’s the first thing you see?

If you said, their face, then you’d be right.

While some people say that they would rather stay home than go out and be around people (definitely guilty of this), the truth is that humans crave these type of one-to-one, face-to-face connections.

And while you can’t really give a true face-to-face interaction with an email, you can mimic this type of interchange by using video in your emails.

Here’s the downside though.

It’s almost impossible to send a full video directly to your contacts.

Even though video has a huge impact on conversions and people love them, email service providers like Gmail or Outlook are pretty behind the times when it comes to making HTML embedded video easily accessible to everyone.

Thankfully, there’s a workaround! You don’t need to play a video directly in an email to use video. You can simply use an image that implies there’s a video to be watched.

See how well-known email copywriter Joanne Wiebe does this.

Notice that her email contains a screenshot of the video she promises to show you on the landing page it connects too. You instantly know looking at it that it’s a video, and having Jo in the frame adds that extra little human touch that would have been missing otherwise.

If your business uses video as part of your overall marketing strategy, then you can double-down in this area by incorporating video into your emails and connecting on a more personal level with your subscribers.

You can use a free tool like Canva to place a button overlay to a screenshot of your video. Or you can use a tool like Giphy Capture to create a short GiF of your video as a little ‘sneak peek’ in your email.

The good news is that Sendlane makes adding these types of images and formats super simple! Just drag-and-drop an mage block in the email editor to add an image or GiF to your email, and voila!

Instant personal touch added.

Caitlin Hutchinson

Caitlin Hutchinson

Brand Marketing ManagerSendlane
A native of San Diego, California, Caitlin has a passion for developing creative and engaging marketing content. Primarily responsible for overseeing the development, execution and delivery of digital content across all of Sendlane’s channels while maintaining an online presence of Sendlane's team culture. Host of The Marketing Automation Hustle Podcast and Sendlane Youtube Training Channel. Works closely with the marketing team to manage creative projects and develop creative assets/solutions to enhance the brand. Collaborates at the intersection of marketing, product, content, and sales to develop powerful and memorable stories and interactive experiences that bring the Sendlane vision to life.
Caitlin Hutchinson