How to Create a “Buy Now” Mindset in Your Emails

Are your emails priming readers for action?

Or do they leave your audience stuck debating whether or not they want to move forward?

You need to know that if your email contacts aren’t taking immediate action, they’re probably not going to act at all.

In fact, one study showed that after just five minutes, you’re 100x less likely to qualify a lead.

Which is exactly why you need to create a “Buy Now” mindset in your emails – compelling readers to act right away with a simple path for them to follow!

Let’s look at how you can create messages that do exactly that.

Decide on Your Strategy

First off, you need to figure out what strategy will work best for the offer you want to promote.

Here are a few different approaches you can take to cultivate a “Buy Now” mindset in your audience:

1. Set a Time Limit

Whether it’s a deep discount from a flash sale at your favorite clothing store, or an infomercial with a “call in the next four minutes” offer – limited time offers cause us to think, “I want that… I better act now.”

Think about it: If you got an email that offered 20% off versus one with a 20% discount for the next 24 hours only, which offer would be more compelling?

The one that’s not going to be around forever.

Open-ended offers just don’t have the same anxiety-producing, must act now pull that these types of offers do.

Why?

Because time limits activate Fear Of Missing Out, or FOMO.

Studies have found that people hate missing out on positive rewards (like a good deal or a special offer) almost 2x more than they love actually getting the deal.

Essentially, that means missing out hurts twice as much as getting the deal feels good.

Limited time offers are proven to activate FOMO – and to drive conversions – by speeding up the decision making process!

The main takeaway here: Open ended sales are okay, but setting a time frame creates a greater sense of urgency to act.

How to do it: Rather than leaving your email offers open-ended, present discounts that are limited to a specific time frame (think pop-up sale or early bird discount) like TOMs does here:

2. Offer Something Scarce

Scarce items are seen as more valuable, appealing, and special – because they’re limited.

It’s the same reason we value diamonds and Black Friday sales. There’s not an endless supply of either, so we are more motivated to attain them whenever possible.

Research showed that when participants were asked to rate two jars of cookies containing the exact same contents (both started with 10 cookies, but then one jar had 8 removed), the jar of scarce cookies were deemed as more valuable.

Strange, right?

Maybe, but not surprising.

People like to feel that they have access to something special and unique that sets them apart from others – hence why scarcity is such a powerful marketing tactic.

Remember what we said about FOMO?

Lulus, a clothing retailer, uses it to inform shoppers of which items are running low. They have a whole section called “Going Fast” for items that are just about to sell out.

 

The main takeaway here: Urgency can work beyond a time perspective. Use limited quantities to convince your contacts to take immediate action.

How to do it: Share limited quantity deals, VIP invites, limited edition releases and exclusive pre-releases to leverage scarcity.

Check out how Nokia did it in their pre-order message:

Make a Clear Path

When crafting your emails, it’s important to remember that you’re working with very limited attention spans.

You only have a few seconds to get your readers’ attention and entice them to follow your call to action. In fact, the data says the average email user only spends 10-15 seconds looking at a message after opening.

Make it easy for your reader to click through and convert once you’ve piqued their interest through your urgent or scarce offer.

Use a single, clear CTA that shows your audience exactly how to act on the information/discount you’ve provided!

The main takeaway here: Simple, direct messages work best, as long as there’s a prominent call-to-action guiding readers to take the next step.

How to do it: Keep your images and copy simple. And be sure your CTA button leverages whitespace, is centrally located, and pops from the body of the email.

Like Moo does in this last call email:

Last, But Not Least – Your Subject Line

We’re working backwards here, but you need to remember that your subject line sets the stage for your marketing message. You have to make it count!

When it comes to priming readers to buy, your subject line must:

  • Cut through the inbox noise
  • Convey a sense of urgency
  • Motivate your contacts to learn more

The main takeaway here: If your subject line doesn’t capture your audience immediately with an exciting offer and urgent language and there’s no way they’ll open up to read the rest of what you have to say.

How to do it: Be specific, compelling and (most importantly) make sure readers know they’re working within a limited context.

Like these perfectly crafted subject lines do:

Is Your Audience Ready to Buy Now?

Getting your email contacts in a “Buy Now” mindset, means that they’re not only ready to make a purchase, but that they act quickly when the time comes.

These techniques can really maximize your offers but remember: If you overdo the anxiety-producing angle for customers, they’ll just get worn out.

Save these tactics for times when it really makes sense and you’ll start seeing conversions and sales roll in in a very dramatic way!

Have you seen any great examples of urgency or scarcity that compelled you to act quickly?

We’d love to hear about what’s worked on you!

Kristen Dahlberg

Content Manager at Sendlane
As a member of the Sendlane content marketing team, Kristen focuses on everything from organization to content curation and process improvement. She enjoys variety and the challenge of learning the best way to accomplish each new goal.

Outside of work, Kristen spends as much time as possible at the beach, soaking up the San Diego sunshine!
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